Latest News

The effects of the Zika virus on New Zealand infants will soon be monitored by the Dunedin School of Medicine.

Dunedin's popularity as a tourism destination is on the increase.

A University of Otago lecturer is branching out from his pharmacy background to help tackle issues with horticulture.

Former New Zealand Prime Minister Helen Clark and Dame Kiri Te Kanawa have both been named as patrons of the city's arts festival.

The Dunedin-based Scorpions' volleyball teams have spent the week in Wellington playing clubs from throughout the country.

Your City

  • The Dunedin-based Scorpions' volleyball teams have spent the week in Wellington playing clubs from throughout the country.

    The women's teams played off for the seventh and eighth places, after not managing a win during the competition.

    The men's side were unbeaten in pool play against teams from all over New Zealand.

    However the men's dream run came to an end when they were beaten in the final this afternoon.

  • Former New Zealand Prime Minister Helen Clark and Dame Kiri Te Kanawa have both been named as patrons of the city's arts festival.

    Dame Kiri has twice performed during the festival and says she's delighted to put her name to the organisation.

    Festival Director Nicholas McBryde says receiving any endorsements from well-known New Zealanders is beneficial.

    He says it helps in attracting both artists and acts to the city not only for this year, but also in the future.

  • A University of Otago lecturer is branching out from his pharmacy background to help tackle issues with horticulture.

    Dr Greg Walker has come up with a way to protect crops from pests by using nano-web technology.

    And it's an idea that's attracting both interest and investment.

  • Dunedin's popularity as a tourism destination is on the increase.

    The city is experiencing the same percentage rise in international visitor numbers as Queenstown, and is only slightly behind Auckland.

    Enterprise Dunedin says the statistics show our city, and its attractions, are proving to be a honey trap.

  • The effects of the Zika virus on New Zealand infants will soon be monitored by the Dunedin School of Medicine.

    From next month, its paediatric surveillance unit will gather data from the country's paediatricians, focussing on abnormalities among at-risk children.

    And staff are hopeful the results will show the virus has had little effect locally.

  • Thousands of dollars worth of computer equipment has been stolen from a local primary school.

    Brockville School was broken into at around 3:30 yesterday morning.

    Those responsible took a number of laptops and other computer accessories from inside a classroom at the Brockville Road site.

    Police are currently reviewing CCTV footage of the incident and are confident they'll track down the offenders.

    They believe another break-in in the area around the same time may also be related to the burglary.

Business

  • Annual building consents nationally are at their highest in over a decade.

    Statistics New Zealand figures reveal that in the year to June, over 29,000 new dwellings gained consent.

    June saw a large increase, with over 2,700 consents granted, up 35% for the same month last year.

    Much of the growth came from Auckland.

  • The latest monthly Regional Tourism Estimates show a strong start to the winter season with increased expenditure in every region.

    Otago led the way with $3.2b in spending by both domestic and international visitors.

    That's an 11% increase on June last year.

    In total six regions saw expenditure of over $1b, something Associate Tourism Minister Paula Bennett attributes to hard work at both national and local levels.

    She says the government remains focused on the dispersal of visitors across New Zealand to make sure all regions benefit from tourism spend.

  • The confidence of the country's farmers is slightly up on last year but remains weak.

    The latest Farm Confidence Survey shows that around 70% of respondents expect their profitability to stay the same or improve over the next year.

    However, Federated Farmers president William Rolleston says many farmers have concerns about the global market post Brexit, and its impact locally.

    He says it's unsurprising almost 40% of respondents identified farm-gate prices as their biggest single concern.

  • The country's fruit exports are continuing to prop up the economy while dairy falls.

    Overall goods exports rose 2.6% in the past year, up $109m.

    Fruit led the increase, gaining 31% to push total goods exports for June to $4.3b.

    Meanwhile the milk powder, butter and cheese commodity group is down $875m for the same period.

  • The economic impact of a large oil or gas discovery in New Zealand has dominated the conversation at a meeting held in Dunedin.

    Cameron Madgwick of the Petroleum Exploration and Production Association spoke with local business representatives about the prospects of further exploration.

    He says any discovery of a near-offshore field could be worth more than $3b, helping create hundreds of jobs in the development phase.

    However it's an idea that's already prompting opposition from environmental groups around the country, including those locally.

  • An American tech expert is in the city, to teach locals how to make the most of a business development programme.

    The start-up scheme has been running for a year after it was implemented following the gigcity win.

    And those behind the programme say it's only going to get better as time goes on.

Local Sport

  • All Blacks coach Steve Hansen will retain his position through to the next Rugby World Cup in 2019.

    His previous contract was set to expire next year following the British and Irish Lions three test tour.

    The 57 year old has been involved in the side's two back-to-back World Cup successes in the past eight years.

    And he's lost just three of 57 All Blacks tests as head coach.

  • After almost 20 years, Kaikorai is once again at the top of premier rugby.

    The side defeated Dunedin 29 points to 22 in Saturday's final at Forsyth Barr Stadium.

    And despite a slow start to the season, the winning captain couldn't be happier with how it's finished.

  • More than 100 children are participating in a football school holiday programme at the Edgar Centre.

    The importance of growing the sport at a grass-roots level is one of the main drivers behind the four day event.

    And although the football season's winding down, there's no let-up in local interest.

  • Dozens of young golfers are braving some trying conditions, in the hope of securing a spot in an upcoming national tournament.

    They're using the end of their school holidays to put in some time on the green for a junior tournament at St Clair.

    And it's helping the fledgling athletes take their game to the next level.

  • Dunedin born rower Alistair Bond is the latest call-up for the New Zealand rowing team heading to Rio.

    The 26 year old is the younger brother of Olympic gold medallist Hamish Bond, who is also part of the 36 strong team.

    Hamish will compete in the men's coxless pairs, while Alistair will be in the lightweight men's coxless fours.

    It's the first time a New Zealand lightweight four has qualified in the Olympic event.

    The younger Bond has been rowing for more than 10 years, and says he would probably not have taken up the sport if it wasn't for his brother.

  • Despite the chilly conditions, over a hundred locals got out and about for a fun-run at the Caledonian.

    The event is part of the annual Cadbury Chocolate Carnival that kicked off at the weekend.

    And it gave participants the chance to hit the track and burn off some chocolate.