Dunedin Television|On Demand - Freeview|HD Channel 39 - Saturday, May 30th, 2015


Dunedin Television | Interview

Film icon. Nightly interview: Peter Crampton

A new health centre is to be established in Caversham, to provide free or low-cost care to those most in need. Otago Medical School dean Professor Peter Crampton is involved in the project, and he joins us to explain what it's all about. ›see story

Film icon. Nightly interview: Alan Mark

Dunedin residents are gathering to discuss climate change issues ahead of the government's involvement in a global summit. Emeritus Professor Alan Mark, of the University of Otago, is involved in the local discussion, and he joins us to explain what it's all about. ›see story

Film icon. Nightly interview: Glen Hazelton

The government's just re-designated Dunedin as a low-risk area for earthquakes. And urban designer Glen Hazelton, of the Dunedin City Council, is here to explain what that means for the owners of local heritage buildings. ›see story

Film icon. Nightly interview: Rosemary Penwarden

About 80 Dunedin residents have joined hands along the St Clair Esplanade for an annual climate change event. Oil Free Otago organised the gathering, and spokeswoman Rosemary Penwarden joins us to explain what it's all about. ›see story

Film icon. Nightly interview: John Le Brun

Resources are stretched at the Dunedin Night Shelter, which largely relies on donations, in order to help needy residents. Those running the facility have just held an open day, and trust member John Le Brun joins us to explain why. ›see story

Film icon. Nightly interview: Stephen Woodhead

Dunedin residents are voicing their opinions about services controlled by the Otago Regional Council. Part of the council's long term plan hearing is taking place in Dunedin, and chairman Stephen Woodhead joins us to talk about it. ›see story

Film icon. Nightly interview: Jen Olsen

Many of Dunedin's leading academics are throwing their weight behind efforts to prevent the Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement. More than two dozen people have signed an open letter about the proposed agreement, written by local woman Jen Olsen. ›see story

Film icon. Nightly interview: Christeen Bates

Each year, more than a thousand children are given activity packs to pass the time while waiting in Dunedin Hospital's emergency department. Mosgiel woman Christeen Bates is involved in the initiative, and she's here to explain why she needs some help. ›see story

Film icon. Nightly interview: Robert Patman

Politicians are focused on Britain following the nation's general election, which has seen David Cameron reinstated as Prime Minister. And local international relations professor Robert Patman joins us to explain what the election result means for New Zealand. ›see story

Film icon. Nightly interview: Matt Carter

Students and staff at Otago Polytechnic may be subject to more comprehensive drug and alcohol testing. The polytechnic's existing policy for drug and alcohol testing is being reviewed. And director of organisational development Matt Carter joins us to explain why. ›see story

Film icon. Nightly interview: Marcelo Rodriguez Ferrere

The Animal Welfare Amendment Bill has passed its final reading in parliament. It brings greater clarity, transparency and enforceability to New Zealand's animal welfare laws. And University of Otago law lecturer Marcelo Rodriguez Ferrere joins us to explain what it means. ›see story

Film icon. Nightly interview: Elizabeth Pack

A local group has been established to preserve an architectural legacy. Elizabeth Pack is the convener of the Basil Hooper Project, and she joins us to explain what it's all about. ›see story

Film icon. Nightly interview: Mel Warhurst

A local university student is about to travel to South Africa, to help people in struggling communities. Mel Warhurst is going through an international exchange programme, and she's here to tell us all about it. ›see story