Dunedin Television|On Demand - Freeview|HD Channel 39 - Friday, January 30th, 2015


Dunedin Television | Interview

Film icon. Nightly interview: Dr Virginia Toy

An international research project to better understand the Alpine Fault has uncovered a wealth of information. Dr Virginia Toy, from the University of Otago, was a leader on the project. And she's here to explain what's been discovered. ›see story

Film icon. Nightly interview: Dr David Tombs

The University of Otago has attracted yet another leading international researcher to join its Dunedin-based staff. Dr David Tombs has just moved to the city from Ireland, to take up the Howard Paterson Chair in Theology and Public Issues. ›see story

Film icon. Nightly interview: Ngaire Bates

Another local branch of the University of the Third Age may be established by a new resident to the city. Ngaire Bates moved to Dunedin recently from Kerikeri, and found the existing Dunedin branch had a lengthy waiting list. And she's here to explain her plans for a new one. ›see story

Film icon. Nightly interview: Ngaire Bates

Another local branch of the University of the Third Age may be established by a new resident to the city. Ngaire Bates moved to Dunedin recently from Kerikeri, and found the existing Dunedin branch had a lengthy waiting list. And she's here to explain her plans for a new one. ›see story

Film icon. Nightly interview: Cathy Rufaut

The fight to rid Otago Peninsula of possums is entering a new phase. The Otago Peninsula Biodiversity Group has some new tricks up its sleeve, and project co-ordinator Cathy Rufaut joins us to explain what they are. ›see story

Film icon. Nightly interview: Davinia Thornley

Dunedin has just won its bid to host an international screenwriting research and networking conference. It'll be the first time the conference has been held in New Zealand, and it's expected to bring hundreds of overseas delegates to the city. University of Otago senior lecturer Davinia Thornley made the bid, and she's here to tell us all about it. ›see story

Film icon. Nightly interview: Liana Machado

A University of Otago study has revealed some surprises about the benefits of physical activity. Senior psychology lecturer Liana Machado led the research, and she's here to tell us all about it. ›see story

Film icon. Nightly interview: David Agnew

A sea lion's recent visit to the saltwater pool at St Clair has brought Dunedin's wildlife to international attention. It's a crucial time of year for many native species which make a home of local beaches. Department of Conservation services manager David Agnew joins us to explain why extra care must be taken around those animals. ›see story

Film icon. Nightly interview: Liz Nidd

December house sales were the second-highest on record, bucking the established trend of a significant December slowdown. The latest data has been collated by the Real Estate Institute of New Zealand, and Otago/Southland spokeswoman Liz Nidd joins us to explain what's happening in the local market. ›see story

Film icon. Nightly interview: Tony Devereux

The southern hemisphere's oldest veteran car rally is about to take place in Dunedin. It's the annual Dunedin to Brighton Veteran Vehicle Run, and it's been held continuously for 61 years. Tony Devereux is involved, and he's here to give us the details. ›see story

Film icon. Nightly interview: Terry Davies

An economic survey on the recent league test at Forsyth Barr Stadium shows the game generated about $3m for the local economy. Stadium boss Terry Davies is thrilled with the result, and he joins us to talk about the importance of hosting sports fixtures. ›see story

Film icon. Nightly interview: Graham Redding

There's a new master at Knox College, one of Dunedin's oldest university halls of residence. The Very Reverend Dr Graham Redding has taken over the role, and he joins us to talk about it. ›see story

Film icon. Nightly interview: Dr Marion Poore

There's been a tiny improvement in the way New Zealanders drink alcohol, revealed in the latest national health survey. It shows the overall level of hazardous drinking has dropped by 2% in the last seven years. And many people feel that's not enough. Dr Marion Poore, from the Southern District Health Board, is here to explain. ›see story